Faculty Publications


“Partisanship in times of crisis: evidence from Italy” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte

Partisanship in times of crisis: evidence from Italy Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte (University of Alabama), Alexa Bankert, and Leonie Huddy Journal Article in Abstract: There is a continuing debate over the political importance and durability of partisan attachments in European multi-party systems. Drawing on a nationally representative five-wave panel, we provide a longitudinal test of the power of partisanship in Italy over the course of the tumultuous 2013 national elections. We find that a strong partisan affiliation measured as a […]

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“Community factors and local governments’ hazard mitigation efforts: Focusing on nonprofit organizations” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji (University of Alabama), et al. 

  Abstract: Even though the role of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) in a disaster management context has been well-studied, scholars have little understanding of NPOs’ engagement in a relationship with local governments, particularly during the hazard mitigation stage. Based on existing studies, we focus on the prominence of local nonprofit organizations in influencing local governments’ hazard mitigation efforts along with other community characteristics. By analyzing panel data on the U.S. counties that experienced presidentially declared disasters, we found that different types […]

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“The Variety of Nonprofit Organizations and Local Hazard Mitigation Efforts” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji (University of Alabama), et al.

Abstract: This study examines how different types of NPOs influence local governments’ hazard mitigation efforts. Based on Marquis et al. (2013), we categorized NPOs into three types and analyzed a county-level dataset (N=1,626) with fixed-effect Poisson regression. Findings indicate that counties with a greater number of NPOs working for enhancing the overall community’s social welfare are more likely to develop hazard mitigation projects. In contrast, the prevalence of elite-oriented NPOs that focus on selective community constituents is negatively associated with […]

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“Irredentism and Institutions” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Chris Hale

Abstract: Why do states engage in irredentism? Expanding on previous scholarship, this article advances a new theory with rationalist microfoundations that accounts for the incentives of both elites and citizens to support irredentism in democracies and dictatorships. Our model suggests irredentism is more likely when it enables political elites to provide a specific mix of private goods, public goods, and welfare transfers to citizens who desire them at the lowest tax rate. This leads to the prediction that irredentism is […]

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“Organizational Performance and Government Resource Allocation: Panel Evidence from Washington State’s Public Programs” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Sungho Park

Abstract: Whether organizational performance shapes government resource allocations or not has long been a contentious issue, especially since the 1990s when the New Public Management movement vitalized performance-based budgeting across countries. To contribute to this ongoing debate, this study examines if different levels of organizational performance achievement affect annual budget changes, focusing on Washington State’s public programs from 2006 to 2015. This study finds a significant relationship between program performance and budget changes, particularly during fiscally hard times. The findings […]

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“The Social Contract in Egypt, Lebanon, and Tunisia: What Do the People Want?” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Holger Albrecht, et al.

Abstract: This article investigates the demand side of social contracts. It asks what people expect from their governments. Drawing on original, nationally representative surveys in Egypt, Tunisia and Lebanon, it explores popular preferences for the three possible government deliverables in social contracts: provision of social and economic services, protection from physical harm and political participation. Findings reveal that citizens expect governments to deliver all three ‘Ps’ (even if this costs a price), yet preferring provision over protection and participation if […]

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“Saints and Warriors: Strategic Choice in Rebel Recruitment in the Syrian Civil War” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Holger Albrecht

Abstract: This article explores how rebel groups come into being and how they sustain their activities. Its core premise is that the strategies used in rebel recruitment are crucial for such organisations. Knowing how rebel groups attract members will tell us why they are strong and, by extension, who is getting the upper hand in violent domestic conflicts. Drawing on empirical findings from the Syrian civil war, the article unpacks strategic choices in rebel recruitment: successful rebel groups benefit from […]

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“States or Social Networks? Popular Attitudes amid Health Crises in the Middle East and North Africa” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Holger Albrecht, et al.

Abstract: The article draws on nationally representative telephone surveys in Tunisia, Egypt and Lebanon to unpack popular beliefs about who can best handle the social and economic consequences from the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It therefore offers insights into state–society relations under stress and contributes to the debate on whether or not the state should play a key role in social protection. Findings reveal intriguing differences between countries, but also among social groups within societies. Communal identities and economic status do […]

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“The effect of natural disasters on household economic hardship during a pandemic” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji, et al.

Abstract: The year 2020 provided a rare opportunity to examine how US households experience economic hardship when natural disasters occur during a large-scale public health crisis, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a nationally representative sample of adults, this study examines the effect of natural disasters on household economic hardships during a pandemic, measured by food insecurity, mortgage or rent delinquency, and unemployment. The study estimated individual fixed-effect models after controlling for time trends and time-variant covariates. We find that […]

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“‘He Knew of a Surety’: Realism, Zionist National-Security Discourse, and the Absent Sublime” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Daniel Levine

Abstract: Drawing on close readings of an understudied Hebrew-language archive—the journal Ma’arakhot—this article examines the emergence of a new political and technical vernacular for the “doing” of national security. That vernacular was both practical and poetic/rhetorical. That is, it aimed to produce intuitive Hebrew-language equivalents for strategic, operational, and tactical concepts used in foreign—especially British, Soviet, and American—sources and to foster a vibrant, expressive, Hebrew-language political vernacular into which they could be placed. The article considers tensions that arose between […]

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Understanding Municipal Fiscal Health: A Model for Local Governments in the USA Book

Author(s): Dr. Sungho Park, et al.

Routledge, 5 February 2023 Abstract: Understanding Municipal Fiscal Health provides an in-depth assessment of the fiscal health of cities throughout the USA. The book examines the tools currently available to cities for designing a revenue structure, measuring fiscal conditions and measuring fiscal health. It explains how artificial policies such as tax and expenditure limitations influence fiscal policies, and how communities can overcome socioeconomic and state-policy barriers to produce strong fiscal conditions. The authors go beyond simple theory to analyze patterns […]

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DOE’s Inclusive Energy Prize Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji, et al.

Abstract: In this project, we will educate and train Alabama students about clean energy practices and career opportunities. For our initiative, we will rely on a cross-sector collaboration including Energy Alabama (nonprofit organization), researchers (University of Alabama faculty across various disciplines), Alabama Industrial Assessment Center (AIAC), and other educational institutions in AL. First, by leveraging Alabama Industrial Assessment Center’s programs on student training and industrial energy assessments, we will provide college students with industrial energy assessment training via a peer […]

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“Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji, et al.

Abstract: Environment, social, and governance (ESG) reporting guidelines are institutional rules that can enhance the credibility of firms’ publicly disclosed information related to ESG. Reporting is often voluntary and global ESG reporting guidelines typically rely on process-focused third party verification. However, in developing its reporting guidelines, the Japanese government gave firms the unusual option of pursuing either process- or content-focused verification. This paper draws on the unique Japanese setting to examine whether firms that use ESG reporting guidelines increase their […]

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“Racial/Ethnic Disparities In Healthcare Resource Access and Drug Use During a Pandemic” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Hyunjung Ji, et al.

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic influenced individuals’ anxiety and depression across the United States over a short period, and some Americans relied on drugs for coping. This study examines American adults’ drug use trajectories in response to changing anxiety and depression levels during the COVID-19 pandemic and the moderating role of substance use disorder (SUD) services provided by non-profit facilities in anxiety/depression-induced drug use. Heterogeneity in such relationships is further explored based on race/ethnicity. This study used a nationally representative sample […]

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Roundtable on Brent Steele’s “Restraint in International Politics” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Daniel Levine

Abstract: Scholarly roundtable on Brent Steele’s monograph ‘Restrain in International Politics’ (Cambridge, 2020), introduced by myself; with contributions by Lina Benabdallah (Wake Forest), Benjamin H. Friedman, (Defense Priorities), Manali Kumar (Universitӓt St. Gallen) and Maria Mälksoo (University of Copenhagen), and a rebuttal by the author.  

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“Who Fakes Support for the Military? Experimental Evidence from Tunisia” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Holger Albrecht

Abstract: Surveys around the world report exceptionally high levels of support for the military. This is particularly relevant for countries in transition from authoritarian rule to democracy, where militaries can play a vital role for democratic consolidation or autocratic backsliding. Given the sensitive nature of the issue, we suspect that figures indicating strong support for the military are at least partly driven by sensitivity bias. We explore this possibility through list experiments in two nationally representative surveys in Tunisia. We […]

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“Examining the fiscal impact of tax and expenditure limitations on municipal governments: a rule design approach” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Sungho Park (University of Alabama)

Abstract: The effect of state fiscal restrictions on local governments is often debatable. While the institutional heterogeneity of such controls is often thought to generate variations in outcomes, more theoretical and empirical attention is imperative. This study aims to address the needs with a particular focus on state-imposed tax and expenditure limitations on municipal governments (municipal TELs), one of the long-standing forms of state pre-emption in the United States. Specifically, it adopts a rule design approach to institutions to capture […]

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