Faculty Publications


Dr. Waleed Hazbun “Tourism and the making of the modern Middle East” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Waleed Hazbun (University of Alabama)

Abstract: This special issue on ‘Tourism and the Making of the Modern Middle East’ is based on a conference sponsored by the Southeast Regional Middle East and Islamic Studies Society (SERMEISS) and held at the University of Alabama in 2022. While mostly focused on developments in Lebanon and Iraq before they gained independence from France and Britain, the essays explore how national actors used tourism to integrate populations within the newly formed political entities of the Mandate era into viable […]

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Dr. Waleed Hazbun “China, the United States, and the Reconfiguration of Middle East Geopolitics: New Possibilities for Conflict and Order” Book Chapter

Author(s): Dr. Waleed Hazbun (University of Alabama)

Abstract: In the past two decades China has expanded its influence in the Middle East, working towards what I call “soft integration,” focused on building economic ties through trade and infrastructure development. In contrast, the United States has continued to prioritize what I call “hard integration,” focused on strategic alliances with security commitments, basing of military assets, and the integration of regional defense systems. An ongoing challenge is that the two integration processes are increasingly encountering points of conflict leading […]

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Dr. Karl DeRouen “Are Non-Inclusive Peace Agreements Effective Counter-Insurgency Strategies” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Karl DeRouen (University of Alabama) and Dr. Marie Olson Lounsbery (East Carolina University)

Abstract: Civil wars are complex in ways that challenge effective resolution. Civil war actors tend to be dynamic in nature and often splinter then coalesce over time potentially evolving into multiple dyads pitted against their government. Previous work has demonstrated that when multiple rebel factions emerge, civil wars tend to be longer in duration as satisfying multiple factions tends to be more challenging. However, governments may choose to pursue dyadic agreements hoping to end the conflict either through subsequent dyadic […]

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“US Military Strategy in the Middle East and the Challenge of Demilitarization” Book Chapter

Author(s): Dr. Waleed Hazbun

Abstract: With its troop withdrawals from Iraq in 2011 and Afghanistan in 2021, the US exhibits a much smaller military footprint in the Middle East than it did in the mid to late 2000s. US regional strategy, however, remains structured around the capacity to deploy military force as a means maintain regional influence, contain Iran, and compete against China and Russia. For many analysts, political leaders, and much of the US public, a reduced military posture in the Middle East […]

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“Revisiting the (lack of) association between objective and subjective measures of local fiscal condition” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Sungho Park (University of Alabama), et al.

  Abstract: Recent fiscal condition literature has been attentive to the consistency between subjective measures of local fiscal condition based on public officials’ perceptions and their objective counterparts measured using financial data. Studies have found little evidence of a relationship between them, leading scholars to speculate flaws in measurement or intentional lack of association. This study reevaluates the issue by investigating intervening explanations for the absence of connection. Analyzing survey and audited financial data from 185 municipalities across 31 states, […]

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“Join or Die: How Deontological Moral Intuitions Complicate Cooperation amid the Covid-19 Pandemic” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte

Abstract: Tackling COVID-19 requires universal collective action: everyone must play their part to reduce the spread of the virus and quell the pandemic. Yet, some people obstinately refuse to cooperate, irrespective of the consequences for themselves and others. In this note, I illustrate a key element of human psychology that hampers cooperation amid the pandemic: deontological moral intuitions. Deontological morality prescribes that moral taboos must be followed no matter the consequences. This means that people who consider Covid vaccines a […]

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“Information about historical emissions drives the division of climate change mitigation costs” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte

Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte (University of Alabama), Aidas Masiliūnas (University of Sheffield), Noah Lim (National University of Singapore)   Abstract: Despite worsening climate change, the international community still disagrees on how to divide the costs of mitigation between developing countries and developed countries, which emitted the bulk of historical carbon emissions. We study this issue using an economic experiment. Specifically, we test how information about historical emissions influences how much participants pay for climate change mitigation. In a four-player game, […]

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“Partisanship in times of crisis: evidence from Italy” Journal Article

Author(s): Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte

Partisanship in times of crisis: evidence from Italy Dr. Alessandro Del Ponte (University of Alabama), Alexa Bankert, and Leonie Huddy Journal Article in Abstract: There is a continuing debate over the political importance and durability of partisan attachments in European multi-party systems. Drawing on a nationally representative five-wave panel, we provide a longitudinal test of the power of partisanship in Italy over the course of the tumultuous 2013 national elections. We find that a strong partisan affiliation measured as a […]

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