Smith, Joseph. “Law, Fact, and the Threat of Reversal From Above.” American Politics Research, March 2014, Volume 42(2): 226-256.

March 15, 2014

“Law, Fact, and the Threat of Reversal From Above.”

Joseph L. Smith, The University of Alabama, Box 870213, 356 ten Hoor Hall Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA. Email: josmith@as.ua.edu

American Politics Research, March 2014, Volume 42(2): 226-256.

Abstract

This article argues that the threat of review and reversal by supervising courts affects circuit court judges differently in disputes focusing on law compared to disputes focusing on facts. Because fact-bound cases are less likely to be reviewed than law-bound cases, lower court judges are freer to indulge their policy preferences in fact-bound cases. I test this argument using computer-assisted content analysis to measure the extent to which legal disputes are based on interpretations of facts and interpretations of relevant legal standards, respectively. The results of this content analysis are then used as independent variables in a model predicting the outcomes of legal challenges to the actions of administrative agencies. The results indicate that highly fact-bound decisions amplify the effects of judicial ideology while highly law-bound decisions constrain the effects of ideology.

Posted under New Publications